Examining the Impact of Individual Time-Activity Patterns in Real-Time on Personal PM2.5 Exposures of Low-income Hispanic Pregnant Women in Los Angeles, CA

Authors: Yan Xu*, Spatial Sciences Institute, USC Dana and David Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences, University of Southern California, Li Yi, Spatial Sciences Institute, USC Dana and David Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences, University of Southern California, Jane Cabison, Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Karl O'Sharkey, Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Thomas Chavez, Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Fred Lurmann, Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Theresa Bastain, Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Carrie Breton, Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, John Wilson, Spatial Sciences Institute, USC Dana and David Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences, University of Southern California, Rima Habre, Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California
Topics: Medical and Health Geography, Geographic Information Science and Systems
Keywords: personal PM2.5 exposure, activity space, time-activity patterns
Session Type: Virtual Paper
Day: 4/9/2021
Start / End Time: 9:35 AM / 10:50 AM
Room: Virtual 25
Presentation File: No File Uploaded


Previous studies have shown the adverse health impacts of air pollutants, such as PM2.5, in pregnancy, however, little work has been done to understand how women’s activity spaces and mobility patterns during pregnancy affect their personal exposures. Using 48-hour personal PM2.5 measurements and real-time geolocation measurements of 213 low-income, Hispanic pregnant women in Los Angeles who enrolled in the “Maternal And Developmental Risks from Environmental and Social Stressors (MADRES)” In-Utero Air Pollution Study, this research examines the relationships between personal PM2.5 measurements and individual time-activity patterns, personal behaviors and home environments. Further, it investigates the impacts of environmental characteristics within residential neighborhoods and personal activity spaces on personal PM2.5 exposures at individual level with fine resolution. The results show that the activity-space derived geospatial exposures are significantly different from the residential neighborhood exposures. The identified factors of residential neighborhood and activity space characteristics, personal behaviors, home environments, ambient air pollution and meteorological conditions at their residence can be used to explain the major variability in personal PM2.5 measurements among this population.

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