Adaptive Governance Beyond the Urban Core: Natural Flood Management in Peri-Urban Manchester

Authors: Amanda Winter*, KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Topics: Urban Geography, Urban and Regional Planning, Land Use and Land Cover Change
Keywords: adaptive governance; climate adaptation; flood management; peri-urban
Session Type: Virtual Paper
Presentation File: No File Uploaded


Climate adaptation is critical for cities of the twenty-first century and many urban stakeholders in the Global North and Global South have begun to develop adaptive governance as an alternative to conventional modes of environmental governance. Adaptive governance involves processes that are collaborative, knowledge-based, contextual, emergent, and transformative. The approach provides multiple opportunities for cities to prepare for climate shocks while also engaging a broad range of stakeholders in climate issues. Much of this work is focused on the urban core and it is unclear how adaptive governance principles can be applied in other geographies that comprise contemporary cities. In this presentation, we present the findings from a case study of flood management in Greater Manchester (UK) - a city-region that has experienced extensive flood events in recent years. While the effects of flooding are most pronounced in the built-up areas of Greater Manchester, many of the causes of flooding can be traced to upstream land uses. In our study, we provide a comparison of how state and non-state organisations are using a natural flood management approach to engage stakeholders in different ways while connecting up to related issues of land use, environmental monitoring, tourism, and local economic development. The findings from Greater Manchester provide multiple insights on how adaptive governance can go beyond the urban core to support climate adaptation capacity at the city-region scale.

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