Latent Factors of Location-Based Daily Mobility in Older Adults

Authors: Eun-Kyeong Kim*, Department of Geography & University Research Priority Program “Dynamics of Healthy Aging”, University of Zurich, Switzerland, Michelle Pasquale Fillekes, Mobility Cooperative, Rotkreuz, Switzerland, Christina Röcke, University Research Priority Program “Dynamics of Healthy Aging”, University of Zurich, Switzerland, Robert Weibel, Department of Geography & University Research Priority Program “Dynamics of Healthy Aging”, University of Zurich, Switzerland
Topics: Medical and Health Geography, Spatial Analysis & Modeling, Transportation Geography
Keywords: healthy aging, mobility, daily mobility, older adults, real life measurement
Session Type: Virtual Paper
Day: 4/10/2021
Start / End Time: 3:05 PM / 4:20 PM
Room: Virtual 8
Presentation File: No File Uploaded


Being mobile in daily life promotes healthy aging. Research on health and aging has recently benefited from location sensing technologies, particularly using GPS-equipped mobile devices, to measure individual-level daily mobility via relatively simple mobility indicators including time spent out of home and the number of visited places. However, in research outside of the health domain, such as geography and transportation, personal mobility has been conceptualized as a more compound construct and quantified through multiple geographic variables (e.g., convex hull, entropy of time usage in different places). Recent interdisciplinary studies at the intersection of the health and GIScience/informatics domain contributed to enriching and diversifying mobility indicators for application in research on health and aging.

Our own previous work (Fillekes et al., 2019) proposed a conceptual framework for the classification of mobility indicators, conducted an exploratory factor analysis on 20 mobility indicators derived from real-life GPS data of 95 older adults residing in Cologne, Germany, and identified 6 latent factors representing a comprehensive set of mobility indicators. In this study, we aim to confirm the generality of such 6 dimensions of daily mobility in older adults. We test the generality in two ways: 1) with a different real-life GPS dataset of community-dwelling older adults and 2) with an extended set of mobility indicators. This research can potentially advocate the generalization of the latent dimensions of individuals’ daily mobility found in previous studies and recommends a set of key mobility indicators for future health- and aging- related research.

Abstract Information

This abstract is already part of a session. View the session here.

To access contact information login