GIScience and Hazards in the Era of Big Data

Type: Virtual Paper
Theme:
Sponsor Groups: Geographic Information Science and Systems Specialty Group, Hazards, Risks, and Disasters Specialty Group
Organizers: Bandana Kar, Joslyn Zale
Chairs: Bandana Kar

Call for Submissions

Extreme weather events have caused significant damage worldwide in recent years. In fact, 2020 is the second most active Atlantic hurricane season, with 25 named tropical cyclones. So far, wildfires have burnt more than 3 million hectares in Oregon, Washington and California. The concurrently occurring and unprecedented global COVID-19 pandemic presents unique challenges; some locations and populations may be affected by both weather and the pandemic, thus requiring mitigation, planning, preparation, and response to two events simultaneously.

With record high extreme weather events across the world, and also the COVID-19 pandemic, the challenges are more focused on how best to use technology to not only reduce risk and prepare for future and potentially simultaneous events, but also how best to address human rights and privacy due to these events.

The convergence of technologies like social media, web-mapping, cloud computing, unmanned aerial systems, and location-based services has revolutionized risk prediction, risk assessment and communication for emergency management and disaster response. These technologies are enabling resilience modeling and hazard mapping in near real-time at local scale for rapid responses. This session seeks presentations integrating geospatial data and technology with computational analytics to understand, assess and forecast potential impacts of hazard events. Possible topics may include but are not limited to:

* Methods for modeling and mapping hazardscapes, risk, and vulnerability
* Spatial decision support systems in emergency management
* Dynamic geographic modeling in emergencies
* GIS/RS applications in mitigation, preparedness, response, or recovery
* The role of geographic information science and data in building community and infrastructure resilience
* Uncertainty in geographic data and modeling in emergencies
* Big data quality and its impact on emergency management activities
* Social media usage in response and recovery efforts
* Citizen science and its role in emergencies
* The dynamics of hazards and their impact on physical and social environments
* Role of remote sensing in disaster informatics, including exploitation of big data and dense satellite time-series.
* Incorporation of UAS imagery in the response process
* The intersection of climate change and hazards
* How technology, vulnerability, resilience, social justice, and hazard mitigation, planning, preparation, response, and recovery are affected when more than one hazard occurs concurrently

Organizers
Bandana Kar, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, karb@ornl.gov
Joslyn Zale, The University of Southern Mississippi, joslyn.zale@usm.edu


Description

Extreme weather events have caused significant damage worldwide in recent years. In fact, 2020 is the second most active Atlantic hurricane season, with 25 named tropical cyclones. So far, wildfires have burnt more than 3 million hectares in Oregon, Washington and California. The concurrently occurring and unprecedented global COVID-19 pandemic presents unique challenges; some locations and populations may be affected by both weather and the pandemic, thus requiring mitigation, planning, preparation, and response to two events simultaneously.

With record high extreme weather events across the world, and also the COVID-19 pandemic, the challenges are more focused on how best to use technology to not only reduce risk and prepare for future and potentially simultaneous events, but also how best to address human rights and privacy due to these events.

The convergence of technologies like social media, web-mapping, cloud computing, unmanned aerial systems, and location-based services has revolutionized risk prediction, risk assessment and communication for emergency management and disaster response. These technologies are enabling resilience modeling and hazard mapping in near real-time at local scale for rapid responses. This session seeks presentations integrating geospatial data and technology with computational analytics to understand, assess and forecast potential impacts of hazard events. Possible topics may include but are not limited to:

* Methods for modeling and mapping hazardscapes, risk, and vulnerability
* Spatial decision support systems in emergency management
* Dynamic geographic modeling in emergencies
* GIS/RS applications in mitigation, preparedness, response, or recovery
* The role of geographic information science and data in building community and infrastructure resilience
* Uncertainty in geographic data and modeling in emergencies
* Big data quality and its impact on emergency management activities
* Social media usage in response and recovery efforts
* Citizen science and its role in emergencies
* The dynamics of hazards and their impact on physical and social environments
* Role of remote sensing in disaster informatics, including exploitation of big data and dense satellite time-series.
* Incorporation of UAS imagery in the response process
* The intersection of climate change and hazards
* How technology, vulnerability, resilience, social justice, and hazard mitigation, planning, preparation, response, and recovery are affected when more than one hazard occurs concurrently

Organizers
Bandana Kar, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, karb@ornl.gov
Joslyn Zale, The University of Southern Mississippi, joslyn.zale@usm.edu


Agenda

Type Details Minutes Start Time
Presenter Asmita Bhattarai*, University of Utah, Earthquake Damage Assessment Using GIS and Remote Sensing: An Application for Nepal 15 12:00 AM
Presenter Bandana Kar*, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, John Brewer, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Olufemi A. Omitaomu, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Arun Iyengar, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Nicholas Roberts, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Rachel Hoesley, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Nizar A. Diab, KeyLogic Systems, Inc., Situational-Temporal Awareness Tool for Integrated Oil and Natural Gas Systems (STATIONS) 15 12:00 AM
Presenter Jinwen Xu*, University of South Florida, Yi Qiang, University of South Florida, Assessing Disaster Resilience from Nighttime Light and Social Media in Hurricane Sandy 15 12:00 AM
Presenter Naser Ahmed*, Department of Geography and Environment, Jagannath University, Dhaka-1100, Bangladesh, Jinhyung Lee, Department of Geography and Environment , Western University, London, Ontario, Canada, Assessing the susceptibility of urban transport systems against the hydro-meteorological hazards using machine learning approaches in Toronto, Canada 15 12:00 AM
Presenter Jonathan Wang*, University of California, Irvine, Clarke Knight, University of California, Berkeley, John Battles, University of California, Berkeley, Michael Goulden, University of California, Irvine, James T Randerson, University of California, Irvine, Fire and management history limit the likelihood and severity of subsequent forest fires in California 15 12:00 AM

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