Evacuation analysis, modeling, and planning: Wildfire

Type: Virtual Paper
Theme: Hazards, Risks, and Disasters Specialty Group Curated Track
Sponsor Groups: Hazards, Risks, and Disasters Specialty Group
Poster #:
Day: 4/10/2021
Start / End Time: 8:00 AM / 9:15 AM (PST)
Room: Virtual 7
Organizers: Dapeng Li, Kevin Ash
Chairs: Dapeng Li

Call for Submissions

Different types of natural and man-made hazards cause significant losses of life and property every year. Evacuation is a widely used proactive action to reduce loss of life by moving threatened residents from the risk area to safer places during disasters. Incident commanders need to take into account the factors concerning the human, built, and natural environments before they make effective protective action recommendations.
Evacuation research plays a significant role in emergency management. The past decade has witnessed a paradigm shift in evacuation research characterized by system coupling and interdisciplinary collaboration. We aim to build a network for evacuation research through this session, and we welcome papers that are related to evacuation in different types of natural or man-made hazards (e.g., hurricanes, wildfires, tornadoes, earthquakes, and earthquakes), and that address one or more of the following topics:
• The coupling of different human and natural systems in evacuation research.
• Relevant case studies on humans’ evacuation behaviors in different disasters.
• New models or techniques to track or predict the progression of different hazards.
• New techniques or systems for evacuation warning.
• New methods and techniques in evacuation modeling and planning.
• The use of open-source tools in evacuation research.
• New computer systems in evacuation research or practice.
• Relevant studies on shelters in evacuations.
• The use of new geospatial technologies in evacuation research and/or practice.
• The use of big data in evacuation research and/or practice.

Interested participants can email your identification number (PIN) and abstract to Dapeng Li (dapeng.li@sdstate.edu) or Kevin Ash (kash78@ufl.edu) by November 17, 2020.

Related publications

Ash, K. D. (2017). A qualitative study of mobile home resident perspectives on tornadoes and tornado protective actions in South Carolina, USA. GeoJournal, 82(3), 533-552.
Cova, T. J., Dennison, P. E., Li, D., Drews, F. A., Siebeneck, L. K., & Lindell, M. K. (2017). Warning triggers in environmental hazards: who should be warned to do what and when?. Risk analysis, 37(4), 601-611.
Li, D., Cova, T. J., & Dennison, P. E. (2019). Setting wildfire evacuation triggers by coupling fire and traffic simulation models: a spatiotemporal GIS approach. Fire Technology, 55(2), 617-642.
Lindell, M. K. (2013). -Evacuation planning, analysis, and management. In Handbook of Emergency Response (pp. 156-185). CRC Press.
Murray-Tuite, P., Lindell, M. K., Wolshon, B., & Baker, E. J. (2018). Large-Scale Evacuation: The Analysis, Modeling, and Management of Emergency Relocation from Hazardous Areas. CRC Press.
Strader, S., Ash, K., Wagner, E., & Sherrod, C. (2019). Mobile home resident evacuation vulnerability and emergency medical service access during tornado events in the Southeast United States. International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction, 101210.
Trainor, J. E., Murray-Tuite, P., Edara, P., Fallah-Fini, S., & Triantis, K. (2012). Interdisciplinary approach to evacuation modeling. Natural Hazards Review, 14(3), 151-162.


Description

Different types of natural and man-made hazards cause significant losses of life and property every year. Evacuation is a widely used proactive action to reduce loss of life by moving threatened residents from the risk area to safer places during disasters. Incident commanders need to take into account the factors concerning the human, built, and natural environments before they make effective protective action recommendations.
Evacuation research plays a significant role in emergency management. The past decade has witnessed a paradigm shift in evacuation research characterized by system coupling and interdisciplinary collaboration. We aim to build a network for evacuation research through this session, and we welcome papers that are related to evacuation in different types of natural or man-made hazards (e.g., hurricanes, wildfires, tornadoes, earthquakes, and earthquakes), and that address one or more of the following topics:
• The coupling of different human and natural systems in evacuation research.
• Relevant case studies on humans’ evacuation behaviors in different disasters.
• New models or techniques to track or predict the progression of different hazards.
• New techniques or systems for evacuation warning.
• New methods and techniques in evacuation modeling and planning.
• The use of open-source tools in evacuation research.
• New computer systems in evacuation research or practice.
• Relevant studies on shelters in evacuations.
• The use of new geospatial technologies in evacuation research and/or practice.
• The use of big data in evacuation research and/or practice.
Interested participants can email your identification number (PIN) and abstract to Dapeng Li (dapeng.li@sdstate.edu) or Kevin Ash (kash78@ufl.edu) by November 17, 2020.
Related publications
Ash, K. D. (2017). A qualitative study of mobile home resident perspectives on tornadoes and tornado protective actions in South Carolina, USA. GeoJournal, 82(3), 533-552.
Cova, T. J., Dennison, P. E., Li, D., Drews, F. A., Siebeneck, L. K., & Lindell, M. K. (2017). Warning triggers in environmental hazards: who should be warned to do what and when?. Risk analysis, 37(4), 601-611.
Li, D., Cova, T. J., & Dennison, P. E. (2019). Setting wildfire evacuation triggers by coupling fire and traffic simulation models: a spatiotemporal GIS approach. Fire Technology, 55(2), 617-642.
Lindell, M. K. (2013). -Evacuation planning, analysis, and management. In Handbook of Emergency Response (pp. 156-185). CRC Press.
Murray-Tuite, P., Lindell, M. K., Wolshon, B., & Baker, E. J. (2018). Large-Scale Evacuation: The Analysis, Modeling, and Management of Emergency Relocation from Hazardous Areas. CRC Press.
Strader, S., Ash, K., Wagner, E., & Sherrod, C. (2019). Mobile home resident evacuation vulnerability and emergency medical service access during tornado events in the Southeast United States. International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction, 101210.
Trainor, J. E., Murray-Tuite, P., Edara, P., Fallah-Fini, S., & Triantis, K. (2012). Interdisciplinary approach to evacuation modeling. Natural Hazards Review, 14(3), 151-162.


Agenda

Type Details Minutes Start Time
Presenter Alex Dye*, Oregon State University, John B. Kim, USDA Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station, Karin L. Riley, USDA Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station, Andrew McEvoy, USDA Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station, Fang Fang, University of Illinois, Evaluating rural Pacific Northwest towns for wildfire evacuation vulnerability 15 8:00 AM
Presenter Dapeng Li*, South Dakota State University, Wildfire evacuation modeling in the big data era: Opportunities and challenges 15 8:15 AM
Presenter Joslyn Zale*, University of Southern Mississippi, Bandana Kar, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Optimizing Stadium Evacuation by Integrating Geo-Computation and Affordance Theory 15 8:30 AM
Presenter Tom Cova*, University of Utah, Planning for dire wildfire evacuations 15 8:45 AM
Discussant Tom Cova University of Utah 15 9:00 AM

To access contact information login