Geospatial Health Symposium 8: Geography and Substance Use 1

Type: Virtual Paper
Theme:
Sponsor Groups: Health and Medical Geography Specialty Group, Geographic Information Science and Systems Specialty Group, Spatial Analysis and Modeling Specialty Group
Organizers: Jeremy Mennis, Kathleen Stewart
Chairs: Kathleen Stewart

Description

Addiction is a chronic disease of the brain that can alter cognitive functioning, mood, and behavior, with negative effects on multiple health outcomes. Substance use disorders involving tobacco, alcohol, and illicit and prescription drugs represent one of the largest threats to public health worldwide. The United States is no exception, where legalization in many states has rapidly changed the accessibility to, and social norms around, cannabis, and the nation faces a rapidly accelerating crisis concerning addiction to opioids, including heroin, fentanyl, and prescription painkillers. This session brings together researchers who are interested in geographic topics relating to substance use and addiction.


Agenda

Type Details Minutes
Presenter Zhiyue Xia*, Center for Geospatial Information Science, Department of Geographical Sciences, University of Maryland, Kathleen Stewart, Center for Geospatial Information Science, Department of Geographical Sciences, University of Maryland, Learning spatiotemporal patterns of drug-related crimes in a major metropolitan area using a random forest model 15
Presenter C├ęcilia Comelli*, CNRS, the accessibility of care for drug users in France 15
Presenter Thomas McKeon*, Temple University, Does medical cannabis legalization reduce the number of young adults seeking treatment for cannabis use disorder? 15
Presenter Jeremy Mennis*, Temple University, Gerald J Stahler, Temple University, Michael Mason, University of Tennessee Knoxville, Does Recreational Marijuana Legalization Increase Substance Use Disorders for Cocaine, Opioids, or Methamphetamines? Evidence from Colorado and Washington 15

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