Political Economies of Settler Colonialism in Canada (and elsewhere)

Type: Virtual Paper
Theme:
Sponsor Groups:
Poster #:
Day: 4/8/2021
Start / End Time: 8:00 AM / 9:15 AM (PDT)
Room: Virtual 36
Organizers: Anna Stanley
Chairs: Anna Stanley

Call for Submissions

Canada is a settler state whose economy depends on its ability to ensure and assert absolute jurisdictional authority in a political-economic context where jurisdiction is far from settled. State assertions of jurisdiction (over Indigenous peoples, their lands and resources) conflict with assertions of Indigenous jurisdiction and sovereignty. Acknowledging that Indigenous resistance and acts of refusal are expressions of Indigenous law and are rooted in Indigenous sovereignty and jurisdiction, this session invites work that examines linkages between settler colonialism and capital accumulation in Canada. We also welcome interventions that examine these linkages in settler colonial contexts elsewhere.

Presentation & discussion topics for this virtual paper/panel session are invited from across urban, environmental, economic and other sub fields and might (but need not) be related to the following themes:
- How settler colonialism mediates and produces specific forms of economy and governance.
-How capitalism articulates colonialism
-Linkages between dispossession, possession and accumulation
-Jurisdiction, resource extraction and/or environmental governance
-Production of colonial space
-Fiscal policy
-Heath and child welfare
- Gentrification
-Jurisdiction and (critical) infrastructure
-Indigenous surveillance and criminalization
-Settler colonial “natures”
-Sovereignty “management”
-Economies of dispossession/ racial capitalism, and colonial capitalism and other predatory forms
-Toxic geographies
-Settler colonialism and neoliberalism/privatization
-Security and securitization of resource capital/critical infrastructure
-Indigenous resistance movements/ways to undermine capitalism and colonial rule
-Blockades and other Indigenous disruptions of the flow of capital
-Indigenous resistance and refusal
-“Risk management” and Indigeneity
-Support for Indigenous resistance and jurisdictional authority


Description

Canada is a settler state whose economy depends on its ability to ensure and assert absolute jurisdictional authority in a political-economic context where jurisdiction is far from settled. State assertions of jurisdiction (over Indigenous peoples, their lands and resources) conflict with assertions of Indigenous jurisdiction and sovereignty. Acknowledging that Indigenous resistance and acts of refusal are expressions of Indigenous law and are rooted in Indigenous sovereignty and jurisdiction, this session invites work that examines linkages between settler colonialism and capital accumulation in Canada. We also welcome interventions that examine these linkages in settler colonial contexts elsewhere.

Presentation & discussion topics for this virtual paper/panel session are invited from across urban, environmental, economic and other sub fields and might (but need not) be related to the following themes:
- How settler colonialism mediates and produces specific forms of economy and governance.
-How capitalism articulates colonialism
-Linkages between dispossession, possession and accumulation
-Jurisdiction, resource extraction and/or environmental governance
-Production of colonial space
-Fiscal policy
-Heath and child welfare
- Gentrification
-Jurisdiction and (critical) infrastructure
-Indigenous surveillance and criminalization
-Settler colonial “natures”
-Sovereignty “management”
-Economies of dispossession/ racial capitalism, and colonial capitalism and other predatory forms
-Toxic geographies
-Settler colonialism and neoliberalism/privatization
-Security and securitization of resource capital/critical infrastructure
-Indigenous resistance movements/ways to undermine capitalism and colonial rule
-Blockades and other Indigenous disruptions of the flow of capital
-Indigenous resistance and refusal
-“Risk management” and Indigeneity
-Support for Indigenous resistance and jurisdictional authority


Agenda

Type Details Minutes Start Time
Presenter James Wilt*, , ‘The ice can be conquered’: The Polar Gas pipeline and the production of cryo-natures 15 8:00 AM
Presenter Matthew Farish*, University of Toronto, The Path to Panarctic: Geological Exploration and the Emergence of an Oil Frontier 15 8:15 AM
Presenter Anna Stanley*, University of Guelph, Pension securitization and colonial capitalism 15 8:30 AM
Presenter Chloe Alexander*, University of Guelph, Anna Stanley, University of Guelph, Mala Prohibita vs Mala in Se: De-regulation and Criminalization in the Alberta Tar Sands 15 8:45 AM

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