Pedagogical Spaces of the Pandemic

Type: Virtual Paper
Theme: Geographers and COVID-19: Setting Our Direction for the Future
Sponsor Groups:
Poster #:
Day: 4/8/2021
Start / End Time: 11:10 AM / 12:25 PM (PDT)
Room: Virtual 24
Organizers: Evan Carver
Chairs: Peter Dunn

Call for Submissions

Among the countless spaces transformed by the Covid-19 pandemic has been the classroom. As distancing requirements have closed schools, universities, museums, and other places of formal learning, educational activity has been transported to digital platforms accessed individually from homes and other private spaces. The spatially inscribed hierarchies of the classroom can in some respects be flattened by this mediation. Still, online learning phenomena like voyeuristic views into household interiors, the co-presence of learning with domestic care responsibilities, and unequal access to computing technologies have simply highlighted and intensified the preexisting disparities of the classroom. Each of the digital tools enabling this extra-classroom education comes with its own set of affordances that shape interactions, reinscribing or subverting existing pedagogical structures. When the pandemic itself becomes a classroom topic, the (unevenly) shared experience of this unfolding event can upend the familiar separation between master and pupil. Moreover, learning continues to happen outside of formally designated spaces, and local environments and communities have taken on new pedagogical roles as we seek to understand this crisis.

Moreover, the geography classroom is a space of study where the study of space is itself paramount. When the subject of inquiry is distant, in the traditional classroom that inquiry is launched from a shared spatial setting; when the subject is nearby, we hope to encounter it first-hand, using field trips, site visits, guest speakers, and other pedagogical modes that foreground the embodied realities of place and space. All of these traditional modes and assumptions have been rent asunder by the pandemic. This raises questions about how pedagogy can and should adapt, and especially about what opportunities emerge when learning in a geographically distributed community.

While virtual classrooms, online education, and other forms of remote learning have longstanding precedents, and geography has long been critically engaged with notions of "virtual" space, the rapid and widespread adoption of these practices accompanying this pandemic invites new reflection on what is gained and what is lost when shared spaces of physical co-presence become distributed and digitally mediated.

We invite papers based on theoretical, empirical, and personal work to this session on the spaces of pedagogy in the Covid-19 pandemic. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

· Affordances of digital technologies

· Leveling or dividing effects of learning platforms

· Opportunities presented by teaching the pandemic

· Humanizing effects of shared experiences of disruption

· Care in virtual classrooms

· Embodiment and learning

· Student subversion and subterfuge

· Transformations of domestic space for learning

· Radical reimagining of formal learning environments

· Novel spaces of informal learning during the pandemic

· Pandemic impacts on spaces of K-12 education

· Challenges with "spatial thinking"

· Challenges with field work and other hands-on methods

· Opportunities unveiled by a mediated, apart-together study of space


Description

Among the countless spaces transformed by the Covid-19 pandemic has been the classroom. As distancing requirements have closed schools, universities, museums, and other places of formal learning, educational activity has been transported to digital platforms accessed individually from homes and other private spaces. The spatially inscribed hierarchies of the classroom can in some respects be flattened by this mediation. Still, online learning phenomena like voyeuristic views into household interiors, the co-presence of learning with domestic care responsibilities, and unequal access to computing technologies have simply highlighted and intensified the preexisting disparities of the classroom. Each of the digital tools enabling this extra-classroom education comes with its own set of affordances that shape interactions, reinscribing or subverting existing pedagogical structures. When the pandemic itself becomes a classroom topic, the (unevenly) shared experience of this unfolding event can upend the familiar separation between master and pupil. Moreover, learning continues to happen outside of formally designated spaces, and local environments and communities have taken on new pedagogical roles as we seek to understand this crisis.

Moreover, the geography classroom is a space of study where the study of space is itself paramount. When the subject of inquiry is distant, in the traditional classroom that inquiry is launched from a shared spatial setting; when the subject is nearby, we hope to encounter it first-hand, using field trips, site visits, guest speakers, and other pedagogical modes that foreground the embodied realities of place and space. All of these traditional modes and assumptions have been rent asunder by the pandemic. This raises questions about how pedagogy can and should adapt, and especially about what opportunities emerge when learning in a geographically distributed community.

While virtual classrooms, online education, and other forms of remote learning have longstanding precedents, and geography has long been critically engaged with notions of "virtual" space, the rapid and widespread adoption of these practices accompanying this pandemic invites new reflection on what is gained and what is lost when shared spaces of physical co-presence become distributed and digitally mediated.

We invite papers based on theoretical, empirical, and personal work to this session on the spaces of pedagogy in the Covid-19 pandemic. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

· Affordances of digital technologies

· Leveling or dividing effects of learning platforms

· Opportunities presented by teaching the pandemic

· Humanizing effects of shared experiences of disruption

· Care in virtual classrooms

· Embodiment and learning

· Student subversion and subterfuge

· Transformations of domestic space for learning

· Radical reimagining of formal learning environments

· Novel spaces of informal learning during the pandemic

· Pandemic impacts on spaces of K-12 education

· Challenges with "spatial thinking"

· Challenges with field work and other hands-on methods

· Opportunities unveiled by a mediated, apart-together study of space


Agenda

Type Details Minutes Start Time
Introduction Evan Carver University of Chicago 5 11:10 AM
Presenter Lynn Abdouni*, College of Environment and Design, Activism and Pandemic: The Role of Informal Student Culture in Reshaping Design Education. 15 11:15 AM
Presenter Scott Ramsey*, Prescott College, Emily Affolter, Prescott College, Kimberley Greeson, Prescott College, Rachel Dunbar, University West Alabama, Gretchen Gano, Prescott College, 2020 Vision: How a Global Pandemic and the Black Lives Matter Movement Focused our Teaching 15 11:30 AM
Presenter Megan Heckert*, West Chester University, GIS for the zombie apocalypse: Problem-based learning and remote engagement in the online GIS classroom 15 11:45 AM
Presenter Ryan Heintzman*, Arizona State, Aldo Brandi, Arizona State University, Madeline Kelley, Arizona State University, M. Colin Marvin, Arizona State University, Student and Instructor Insights for an Online Synchronous Introductory Geography Lab Using Interactive Geovisualization “Video Games” – Fall 2020 Term at Arizona State University 15 12:00 PM
Discussant Peter Dunn University of Washington 10 12:15 PM

To access contact information login