Heat Resilience in Cities: Science, Policy, and Design 2

Type: Virtual Paper
Theme: Hazards, Risks, and Disasters Specialty Group Curated Track
Sponsor Groups: Climate Specialty Group, Human Dimensions of Global Change Specialty Group, Hazards, Risks, and Disasters Specialty Group
Poster #:
Day: 4/11/2021
Start / End Time: 9:35 AM / 10:50 AM (PDT)
Room: Virtual 7
Organizers: V. Kelly Turner
Chairs: Morgan Rogers

Call for Submissions

Heat is a central climate adaptation issue for cities, which can be 10°F hotter than surrounding areas due to the Urban Heat Island effect. Extreme heat is a leading cause of weather-related deaths and it is understood that current estimates likely under-count the extent of heat-related morbidity and mortality. Heat exposure and sensitivity is uneven across cities, contributing to higher heat-related vulnerability among lower income communities and people of color that may lack access to key resources such as shade and air conditioning. Climate change will compound the problem, adding and intensifying extreme heat days annually. Cities have begun to respond to the challenge with design interventions such as urban greening, cool surface technology and other policies intended to reduce temperatures and heat exposure. Yet, the effectiveness of such interventions in practice is not well understood, particularly considering trade-offs between interventions, different heat reduction goals (land surface temperature, air temperature, thermal comfort), and other dimensions of urban sustainability. We invite papers that untangle relationships between heat, policy, and design in cities. We welcome a wide range of approaches inclusive of large scale assessments, modeling, case studies, theoretical explorations, and applied work. Potential topic areas include, but are not limited to:

Exploring the causes and consequences of land change and urban design on urban heat, microclimate, and thermal comfort;
Evaluation of policies, initiatives, and interventions designed to mitigate or cope with extreme heat;
Analysis of trade-offs and synergies associated with different heat adaptation strategies;
Discussions of vulnerability to heat and environmental justice;
Assessments of future urban heat conditions under different climate change and adaptation scenarios.

Please reach out to Kelly Turner or one of the other session organizers to be added to the session.

Kelly Turner (vkturner@ucla.edu), University of California Los Angeles
David M. Hondula, Arizona State University
Ladd Keith, University of Arizona
Sara Meerow, Arizona State University
Ariane Middel, Arizona State University


Description

Heat is a central climate adaptation issue for cities, which can be 10°F hotter than surrounding areas due to the Urban Heat Island effect. Extreme heat is a leading cause of weather-related deaths and it is understood that current estimates likely under-count the extent of heat-related morbidity and mortality. Heat exposure and sensitivity is uneven across cities, contributing to higher heat-related vulnerability among lower income communities and people of color that may lack access to key resources such as shade and air conditioning. Climate change will compound the problem, adding and intensifying extreme heat days annually. Cities have begun to respond to the challenge with design interventions such as urban greening, cool surface technology and other policies intended to reduce temperatures and heat exposure. Yet, the effectiveness of such interventions in practice is not well understood, particularly considering trade-offs between interventions, different heat reduction goals (land surface temperature, air temperature, thermal comfort), and other dimensions of urban sustainability. We invite papers that untangle relationships between heat, policy, and design in cities. We welcome a wide range of approaches inclusive of large scale assessments, modeling, case studies, theoretical explorations, and applied work. Potential topic areas include, but are not limited to:

Exploring the causes and consequences of land change and urban design on urban heat, microclimate, and thermal comfort;
Evaluation of policies, initiatives, and interventions designed to mitigate or cope with extreme heat;
Analysis of trade-offs and synergies associated with different heat adaptation strategies;
Discussions of vulnerability to heat and environmental justice;
Assessments of future urban heat conditions under different climate change and adaptation scenarios.


Agenda

Type Details Minutes Start Time
Presenter Juliane Kemen*, Institute for Hygiene and Public Health, University of Bonn, Silvia Schäffer-Gemein, Institute for Hygiene and Public Health, University of Bonn, Thomas Kistemann, Institute for Hygiene and Public Health, University of Bonn, Heat perception and adaptive behavior of older adults in the city of Cologne, Germany 15 9:35 AM
Presenter Shaylynn Trego*, University of Utah, Sara Grineski, University of Utah, Timothy Collins, Univeristy of Utah, Aaron B. Flores, University of Utah, Roger Renteria, University of Utah, Disparities in Extreme Heat Exposure in Maricopa County, Arizona: The Intersection of Race/ethnicity and Older Age 15 9:50 AM
Presenter Kyusik Kim*, Florida State University, Jihoon Jung, University of Washington, Claire Schollaert, University of Washington, A Comparative Assessment of Cooling Center Service Coverages and Access Disparities in Vulnerable Subpopulation Groups across Twenty-five US Cities 15 10:05 AM
Presenter Rachel Corcoran-Adams*, Clark University, John Rogan, Advisor, Deborah Martin, Fellowship Co-Director, Marc Healy, Doctoral Student Supervisor, Nicholas Geron, Doctoral Student Supervisor, Analysis of the Surface Urban Heat Island in Chicopee, Massachusetts, using Landsat -8 Analysis Ready Thermal Imagery 15 10:20 AM
Presenter V. Kelly Turner*, University of California Los Angeles, How Are Cities Planning for Heat? A National Assessment of Municipal Heat Plans 15 10:35 AM

To access contact information login