Remote Sensing and Long-Term Environmental Change in the Maya Lowlands and the Neotropics: Part 1

Type: Virtual Paper
Theme:
Sponsor Groups: Paleoenvironmental Change Specialty Group, Remote Sensing Specialty Group, Latin America Specialty Group
Poster #:
Day: 4/11/2021
Start / End Time: 8:00 AM / 9:15 AM (PDT)
Room: Virtual 36
Organizers: Samantha Krause, Sara Eshleman, Amy Thompson
Chairs: Samantha Krause

Call for Submissions

We are assembling a session around lidar and long-term environmental change for AAG 2021 (April 7-11, 2021). Please see the description below. If you would like to participate, the paper abstract deadline is currently set for Thursday (11/19) and abstracts can be edited until February. Please e-mail your AAG pin to the organizers once your abstract is submitted. We look forward to your papers!

Remote sensing technologies combined with high-resolution environmental data enhance our understanding of past and present landscapes. In the past decade, lidar has revolutionized our ability to assess landscapes and, combined with proxy data and spatial modeling, can be used to understand changes in environments and landscapes. This session highlights the use of remote sensing technologies, specifically lidar, with multi-proxy data to evaluate long term environmental change in the Neotropics of the Maya Lowlands. Session topics include human-environment interactions using stable isotopic data from speleothems to evaluate climate change, modern precipitation records and spatial modeling to evaluate the changes in water availability, soil studies to assess variability in agricultural practices, and archaeological features and radiocarbon assays to model demographic shifts. Understanding the impacts of long-term environmental change on past societies elucidates how similar processes may affect modern global communities.


Description

Remote sensing technologies combined with high-resolution environmental data enhance our understanding of past and present landscapes. In the past decade, lidar has revolutionized our ability to assess landscapes and, combined with proxy data and spatial modeling, can be used to understand changes in environments and landscapes. This session highlights the use of remote sensing technologies, specifically lidar, with multi-proxy data to evaluate long term environmental change in the Neotropics, with a focus on the Maya Lowlands. Paper topics include human-environment interactions using stable isotopic data from speleothems to evaluate climate change, modern precipitation records and spatial modeling to evaluate the changes in water availability, soil and vegetation studies to assess variability in agricultural practices, and archaeological features and radiocarbon assays to model demographic shifts. Understanding the impacts of long-term environmental change on past societies elucidates how similar processes may affect modern global communities.


Agenda

Type Details Minutes Start Time
Presenter Thomas Garrison*, University of Texas At Austin, J. Dennis Baldwin, University of Texas at Austin, Anna Bishop, University of California, Los Angeles, Rafael Cambranes, Universidad de San Carlos, Guatemala, Decoding the Palimpsest: Methods for Regional Chronology Building in Neotropical Landscapes Surveyed with Lidar 15 8:00 AM
Presenter Nicholas Dunning*, University of Cincinnati, Thomas Ruhl, University of Cincinnati, Christopher Carr, University of Cincinnati, Jeffrey Brewer, University of Cincinnati, Ivan Šprajc, Research Center of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Kathryn Reese-Taylor, University of Calgary, Armando Anaya Hernández, Universidad Autónoma de Campeche, The Ancient Maya Landscape Footprint: How Many, and How Large were the Feet? 15 8:15 AM
Presenter Whittaker Schroder*, University of Florida, UAV LiDAR Mapping for Archaeological and Environmental Applications in Chiapas, Mexico 15 8:30 AM
Presenter J. Dennis Baldwin*, University of Texas at Austin, Thomas Garrison, University of Texas at Austin, Timothy Beach, University of Texas at Austin, Sheryl Luzzadder-Beach, University of Texas at Austin, Assessing Newly Discovered Small-Scale Hydrologic Infrastructure Near El Zotz, Guatemala 15 8:45 AM
Presenter Amy E. Thompson*, University of Texas at Austin, Keith M. Prufer, University of New Mexico , Andrew D. Wickert, University of Minnesota - Twin Cities, Douglas J. Kennett, University of California - Santa Barbara, Demography, Environmental Change, and Climate Variability at the Classic Maya Center of Uxbenká in Southern Belize 15 9:00 AM

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