Film, knowledge and power: Reflecting on the impact of the use of film for knowledge production

Type: Virtual Paper
Theme:
Sponsor Groups: Film-Making and Screening Specialty Group
Poster #:
Day: 4/8/2021
Start / End Time: 1:30 PM / 2:45 PM (PDT)
Room: Virtual 48
Organizers: Joseph Palis, Jessica Jacobs
Chairs: Jessica Jacobs

Call for Submissions

‘The geographical film is a film that explores people’s relationship to their environment, a film that is place-based, and where that ‘place’, often dismissed as ‘background’ in other films, is treated like a character in its own right with agency and voice.' (Jacobs and Palis, 2020)

Filmmaking is a different form of knowledge production to text. The form of knowledge it creates is diverse and often contested. In the social sciences it has been designated variously within the parameters pre-assigned by the history of filmmaking (e.g. documentary or edutainment), restricted to the category of a ‘visual’ method, assumed to be a form of visual text (e.g. visual essay), used as a form of description of human cultures (ethnography) or as a form of community engagement and activism (e.g. participatory video) (Jacobs 2015).

The significant shift in interest into more creative research methods has coincided with the call to decolonise the university – with its focus on methodologies produced by and carried out by local communities and indigenous actors. The Covid-19 pandemic has also restricted geographers in the global north from conducting fieldwork in the global south which has led them to be increasingly reliant on local community researchers.

This puts film and filmmaking in geography in an interesting space where we can question how we produce knowledge in the first place, and how that knowledge is used to exert control. What are the potential opportunities and challenges for film and filmmaking during a pandemic, as a creative research method that is online, networked, platformed and that offers new forms of representation? What impact will the impetus to decolonise, the growing dependency on local narratives and the growing awareness of the need to include some form of community engagement in geographical research and practice have on the geographical film? How will these changes influence the way we produce and disseminate geographical knowledge in a broader sense?

We welcome any papers (other formats also welcome) that explore these questions. Papers that reflect on changes to existing research as a result of these shifts also welcomed. Please send a 300-word abstract by November 18, 2020 following AAG guidelines to Jessica Jacobs j.jacobs@qmul.ac.uk and Joseph Palis jepalis@up.edu.ph

General Registration details below:
1. Register online with the AAG to obtain a PIN.
2. Email Presenter Identification Number (PIN) and abstract to Joseph Palis jepalis@up.edu.ph and Jessica Jacobs j.jacobs@qmul.ac.uk


Description

‘The geographical film is a film that explores people’s relationship to their environment, a film that is place-based, and where that ‘place’, often dismissed as ‘background’ in other films, is treated like a character in its own right with agency and voice.' (Jacobs and Palis, 2020)

Filmmaking is a different form of knowledge production to text. The form of knowledge it creates is diverse and often contested. In the social sciences it has been designated variously within the parameters pre-assigned by the history of filmmaking (e.g. documentary or edutainment), restricted to the category of a ‘visual’ method, assumed to be a form of visual text (e.g. visual essay), used as a form of description of human cultures (ethnography) or as a form of community engagement and activism (e.g. participatory video) (Jacobs 2015).

The significant shift in interest into more creative research methods has coincided with the call to decolonise the university – with its focus on methodologies produced by and carried out by local communities and indigenous actors. The Covid-19 pandemic has also restricted geographers in the global north from conducting fieldwork in the global south which has led them to be increasingly reliant on local community researchers.

This puts film and filmmaking in geography in an interesting space where we can question how we produce knowledge in the first place, and how that knowledge is used to exert control. What are the potential opportunities and challenges for film and filmmaking during a pandemic, as a creative research method that is online, networked, platformed and that offers new forms of representation? What impact will the impetus to decolonise, the growing dependency on local narratives and the growing awareness of the need to include some form of community engagement in geographical research and practice have on the geographical film? How will these changes influence the way we produce and disseminate geographical knowledge in a broader sense?

We welcome any papers (other formats also welcome) that explore these questions. Papers that reflect on changes to existing research as a result of these shifts also welcomed. Please send a 300-word abstract by November 18, 2020 following AAG guidelines to Jessica Jacobs j.jacobs@qmul.ac.uk and Joseph Palis jepalis@up.edu.ph

General Registration details below:
1. Register online with the AAG to obtain a PIN.
2. Email Presenter Identification Number (PIN) and abstract to Joseph Palis jepalis@up.edu.ph and Jessica Jacobs j.jacobs@qmul.ac.uk


Agenda

Type Details Minutes Start Time
Presenter Heather Davis*, University of Tennessee, Community Film and Radio – What Our Audiences Teach Us About Geography 15 1:30 PM
Presenter Elisabeth Sommerlad*, JGU Mainz, Institute of Geography, Julian Zschocke*, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, “Places of the Coronavirus” – Exploring Globalized Pandemic Narratives in a Class on Filmic Geography 15 1:45 PM
Presenter Joseph Palis*, University of the Philippines-Diliman, What is a Geographical Film?: Learning from the Curation of GeoStories and GeoNarratives in FilmGeographies 15 2:00 PM
Presenter Magdalena García*, Universite De Montreal, The production of modern natures: Films and Canadian national parks. 15 2:15 PM
Presenter John Henry*, University of Kansas, Film as Geopolitical Intervention: a collaborative, transnational creative project 15 2:30 PM

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