Remote Sensing and Long-Term Environmental Change in the Maya Lowlands and the Neotropics: Part 3

Type: Virtual Paper
Theme:
Sponsor Groups: Paleoenvironmental Change Specialty Group, Remote Sensing Specialty Group, Latin America Specialty Group
Poster #:
Day: 4/11/2021
Start / End Time: 11:10 AM / 12:25 PM (PDT)
Room: Virtual 36
Organizers: Samantha Krause, Sara Eshleman, Amy Thompson
Chairs: Sara Eshleman

Call for Submissions

We are assembling a session around lidar and long-term environmental change for AAG 2021 (April 7-11, 2021). Please see the description below. If you would like to participate, the paper abstract deadline is currently set for Thursday (11/19) and abstracts can be edited until February. Please e-mail your AAG pin to the organizers once your abstract is submitted. We look forward to your papers!

Session title: Lidar and Long-Term Environmental Change in the Maya Lowlands

Session abstract:
Remote sensing technologies combined with high-resolution environmental data enhance our understanding of past and present landscapes. In the past decade, lidar has revolutionized our ability to assess landscapes and, combined with proxy data and spatial modeling, can be used to understand changes in environments and landscapes. This session highlights the use of remote sensing technologies, specifically lidar, with multi-proxy data to evaluate long term environmental change in the neotropics of the Maya Lowlands. Session topics include human-environment interactions using stable isotopic data from speleothems to evaluate climate change, modern precipitation records and spatial modeling to evaluate the changes in water availability, soil studies to assess variability in agricultural practices, and archaeological features and radiocarbon assays to model demographic shifts. Understanding the impacts of long-term environmental change on past societies elucidates how similar processes may affect modern global communities.


Description

Remote sensing technologies combined with high-resolution environmental data enhance our understanding of past and present landscapes. In the past decade, lidar has revolutionized our ability to assess landscapes and, combined with proxy data and spatial modeling, can be used to understand changes in environments and landscapes. This session highlights the use of remote sensing technologies, specifically lidar, with multi-proxy data to evaluate long term environmental change in the Neotropics, with a focus on the Maya Lowlands. Paper topics include human-environment interactions using stable isotopic data from speleothems to evaluate climate change, modern precipitation records and spatial modeling to evaluate the changes in water availability, soil and vegetation studies to assess variability in agricultural practices, and archaeological features and radiocarbon assays to model demographic shifts. Understanding the impacts of long-term environmental change on past societies elucidates how similar processes may affect modern global communities.


Agenda

Type Details Minutes Start Time
Presenter Timothy Beach*, University of Texas at Austin, Sheryl Luzzadder-Beach, University of Texas at Austin, Takeshi Inomata, University of Arizona, Lidar assessment of Wetlands and Long-Term Water Management on the coastal plains of Tabasco and Campeche, Mexico and their links to Holocene Global Change 15 11:10 AM
Presenter Byron Smith*, Department of Geography and the Environment, Tim Beach, University of Texas at Austin, Sheryl Luzzadder-Beach, University of Texas at Austin, Exploring the Durable Effects of Climate and Anthropogenic Factors in Ancient Wetlands 15 11:25 AM
Presenter Leila Character*, University of Texas at Austin, Tim Beach, University of Texas at Austin, Cody Schank, University of Texas at Austin, Takeshi Inomata, University of Arizona, Agustin Ortiz JR, Underwater Archaeology Branch, Naval History and Heritage Command, Machine learning applications in geoarchaeology: Using digital elevation data to model locations of natural and cultural features 15 11:40 AM
Presenter Colin Doyle*, University of Texas - Austin, Sheryl Luzzadder-Beach, University of Texas at Austin, Timothy Beach, University of Texas at Austin, Machine Learning with LiDAR and Geoarchaeology of Ancient Maya Wetland Field Complexes 15 11:55 AM
Discussant Samantha Krause Texas State University - San Marcos 15 12:10 PM

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