Crisis Housing Assemblages II

Type: Virtual Paper
Theme: HDGC & HRD Symposium: Socio-ecological Justice in Hazards Adaptation
Sponsor Groups:
Poster #:
Day: 4/10/2021
Start / End Time: 9:35 AM / 10:50 AM (PDT)
Room: Virtual 6
Organizers: Mark Kear, Margaret Wilder, Esther Sullivan, Patricia Solís
Chairs: Margaret Wilder

Call for Submissions

Housing is a site of intersecting financial, social, environmental and health crises.

• The Global Financial Crisis was triggered by the collapse of US housing bubble.
• Monetary easing has fueled real estate speculation and asset price inflation, exacerbating housing-cost burdens and pushing urban housing systems into crisis around the world.
• Climate change threatens the housing security of vulnerable populations, especially low-income communities of color, through extreme heat and weather, sea-level rise and flooding, fire, drought, lost livelihoods and higher energy costs.
• The coronavirus pandemic has threatened access to safe housing for many as it has made it more important for all.

These intersecting crises have also made housing a site of intense struggle, capital accumulation, and experimentation. New “urban housing assemblages” (Jayne and Hall 2019) – novel arrangements of policies, practices, affects, discourses, materials, money, etc. – are taking form to cope with these intersecting crises and respond to climate change, housing insecurity, and overaccumulation (Lovell and Smith 2010; Blok 2015; Edwards and Bulkeley, 2016; Cohen 2019).

The result is new combinations of building technologies and materials (prefabrication, manufactured housing, etc.), financial instruments (REITs), credit products (securitization schemes), tax shelters (historic credits, opportunity zones), monitoring devices (smart homes), housing practices (self-build, tiny and container homes, conversion of garages, sheds, and so on), and tenure forms (co-housing, land trusts), that together are producing new markets (short-term rentals, housing platformization), asset classes (single family rental), and housing relations within, beyond and between markets.

As the scholarship on housing insecurity grows, there is an emerging recognition of the way environmental factors such as climate change intersect with insecure housing to compound vulnerability for low-income populations, resulting in greater risk to climate-related disasters as well as higher exposure to chronic and extreme conditions such as extreme heat and cold.

Papers in these sessions will explore emerging housing assemblages – market and non-market – taking shape in response to environmental, financial, social and public health dimensions of the contemporary housing crisis.


Description

Housing is a site of intersecting financial, social, environmental and health crises.

• The Global Financial Crisis was triggered by the collapse of US housing bubble.
• Monetary easing has fueled real estate speculation and asset price inflation, exacerbating housing-cost burdens and pushing urban housing systems into crisis around the world.
• Climate change threatens the housing security of vulnerable populations, especially low-income communities of color, through extreme heat and weather, sea-level rise and flooding, fire, drought, lost livelihoods and higher energy costs.
• The coronavirus pandemic has threatened access to safe housing for many as it has made it more important for all.

These intersecting crises have also made housing a site of intense struggle, capital accumulation, and experimentation. New “urban housing assemblages” (Jayne and Hall 2019) – novel arrangements of policies, practices, affects, discourses, materials, money, etc. – are taking form to cope with these intersecting crises and respond to climate change, housing insecurity, and overaccumulation (Lovell and Smith 2010; Blok 2015; Edwards and Bulkeley, 2016; Cohen 2019).

The result is new combinations of building technologies and materials (prefabrication, manufactured housing, etc.), financial instruments (REITs), credit products (securitization schemes), tax shelters (historic credits, opportunity zones), monitoring devices (smart homes), housing practices (self-build, tiny and container homes, conversion of garages, sheds, and so on), and tenure forms (co-housing, land trusts), that together are producing new markets (short-term rentals, housing platformization), asset classes (single family rental), and housing relations within, beyond and between markets.

As the scholarship on housing insecurity grows, there is an emerging recognition of the way environmental factors such as climate change intersect with insecure housing to compound vulnerability for low-income populations, resulting in greater risk to climate-related disasters as well as higher exposure to chronic and extreme conditions such as extreme heat and cold.

Papers in these sessions will explore emerging housing assemblages – market and non-market – taking shape in response to environmental, financial, social and public health dimensions of the contemporary housing crisis.


Agenda

Type Details Minutes Start Time
Presenter Katsiaryna Varfalameyeva*, Arizona State University, Patricia Solís , Arizona State University, Lora Phillips , Arizona State University, Elisha Charley , Arizona State University, Heat Resilience and Housing Assemblages: effects on home and well being among mobile home dwellers of Mesa, Arizona 15 9:35 AM
Presenter Bianca Malkoc*, University of Oregon, Rebuilding Precarity: Dwellings & Demolitions in Jamestown Harbor, Accra, Ghana 15 9:50 AM
Presenter Margaret Wilder*, University of Arizona, Mark Kear, University of Arizona, ‘Lives in a Trailer’: Energy justice and manufactured housing communities’ vulnerability and resilience 15 10:05 AM
Presenter Laura McCann*, University of Arizona School of Geography, Development & Environment, Robert Hibberd*, University of Arizona - Geography & Development, Mark Kear, University of Arizona School of Geography, Development & Environment, Housing Insecurity in Tucson and Beyond: A Case Study of Manufactured Housing 15 10:20 AM
Discussant Esther Sullivan University of Colorado Denver 15 10:35 AM

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