Race and Refugee Geographies II: Exploring Border Politics: Racialized Violence, Agency, and Resilience

Type: Virtual Paper
Theme:
Sponsor Groups: Qualitative Research Specialty Group, Feminist Geographies Specialty Group
Poster #:
Day: 4/10/2021
Start / End Time: 3:05 PM / 4:20 PM (PDT)
Room: Virtual 36
Organizers: Sarah Ryniker, Kristin Sziarto
Chairs: Sarah Ryniker

Call for Submissions

A tumultuous summer of conflict over racial politics and a contentious US election season has drawn attention to the politics of race in many realms, including the intersection of race and refugee politics. Refugees are deeply affected by the social, political, and economic forces that converge in, and are shaped by, these events. Racialization and racialized identities are produced through state, local, and individual processes constantly (Omi and Winant, 2014). Researchers have demonstrated how racialized, gendered, and exclusionary discourses regarding migrants have evolved to represent whole communities rather than individuals (Ehrkamp, 2008; 2017). For this session, we specify refugees as not only those who meet formal criteria and achieve refugee status but as any migrant who experiences forced migration and is seeking refuge (Buff, 2019).

In this virtual paper session, we aim to address the intersections of critical race and refugee geographies to develop an agenda for further research at the local and state level. We are especially interested in refugee agency and how refugees articulate and shape their own experiences. We welcome research on decolonial, feminist, and race politics.

Paper topics may include:
Empirical or theoretical papers related to the intersection of race and refugees
The role of VOLAGs and resettlement agencies in refugee communities
Refugee agency and their embodied experiences within racial formations
Research centering voices of refugees
Urban refugee resettlement
Citizenship, refugee status, and racial formations
The role of religion in racialized representations of refugees
Critical and qualitative engagements with refugee communities

Logistics:
We encourage participants to join in the conversation by submitting an abstract of no more than 250 words to sryniker@uwm.edu by Oct. 25 (earlier submissions are encouraged). We will respond no later than Oct 30. Please reach out with any questions.

References:
Buff, R. I. (2019). Sanctuary Everywhere: Some Key Words, 1945–Present. Radical History Review, 2019(135), 14-42.
Ehrkamp, P. (2008). Risking publicity: masculinities and the racialization of public neighborhood space. Social & Cultural Geography, 9(2), 117-133.
Ehrkamp, P. (2017). Geographies of migration I: Refugees. Progress in Human Geography, 41(6), 813-822.
Omi, M., & Winant, H. (2014). Racial formation in the United States. Routledge.


Description

A tumultuous summer of conflict over racial politics and a contentious US election season has drawn attention to the politics of race in many realms, including the intersection of race and refugee politics. Refugees are deeply affected by the social, political, and economic forces that converge in, and are shaped by, these events. Racialization and racialized identities are produced through state, local, and individual processes constantly (Omi and Winant, 2014). Researchers have demonstrated how racialized, gendered, and exclusionary discourses regarding migrants have evolved to represent whole communities rather than individuals (Ehrkamp, 2008; 2017). For this session, we specify refugees as not only those who meet formal criteria and achieve refugee status but as any migrant who experiences forced migration and is seeking refuge (Buff, 2019).

In this virtual paper session, we aim to address the intersections of critical race and refugee geographies to develop an agenda for further research at the local and state level. We are especially interested in refugee agency and how refugees articulate and shape their own experiences. We welcome research on decolonial, feminist, and race politics.

Paper topics may include:
Empirical or theoretical papers related to the intersection of race and refugees
The role of VOLAGs and resettlement agencies in refugee communities
Refugee agency and their embodied experiences within racial formations
Research centering voices of refugees
Urban refugee resettlement
Citizenship, refugee status, and racial formations
The role of religion in racialized representations of refugees
Critical and qualitative engagements with refugee communities

Logistics:
We encourage participants to join in the conversation by submitting an abstract of no more than 250 words to sryniker@uwm.edu by Oct. 25 (earlier submissions are encouraged). We will respond no later than Oct 30. Please reach out with any questions.

References:
Buff, R. I. (2019). Sanctuary Everywhere: Some Key Words, 1945–Present. Radical History Review, 2019(135), 14-42.
Ehrkamp, P. (2008). Risking publicity: masculinities and the racialization of public neighborhood space. Social & Cultural Geography, 9(2), 117-133.
Ehrkamp, P. (2017). Geographies of migration I: Refugees. Progress in Human Geography, 41(6), 813-822.
Omi, M., & Winant, H. (2014). Racial formation in the United States. Routledge.


Agenda

Type Details Minutes Start Time
Presenter Robin Finlay*, Newcastle University, Peter Hopkins, Newcastle University, Matt Benwell, Newcastle University, Lockdown and the Spatial and Temporal Reshaping of Asylum Seeker and Refugee Everyday Lives 15 3:05 PM
Presenter Irma Losada Olmos*, UCLA, Race and Empire in U.S. Border Externalization to Mexico 15 3:20 PM
Presenter Kara E. Dempsey*, Appalachian State University, Asylum camps as geopolitical spaces of embodied violence and migrant agency 15 3:35 PM
Presenter Mehrnush Golriz*, UCLA, Managing Difference: Inequalities in Boa Vista’s Migrant Shelters 15 3:50 PM
Discussant Sarah Ryniker University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee 15 4:05 PM

To access contact information login